Thanks for coming

Image from FlickR Courtesy of Krissy.Venosdale

Following my recent blog post, here’s an alternative way that it could run.

*Imagine your screen wobbling like some weird 70s TV flashback*

Thanks for coming to this blog post after last time.  The content is flexible and I know some people will be joining us later.  I’ve taken the content of this post based on the areas you polled on a linoit.com board you set up.

The areas you mentioned were included on the crib sheet we posted on the blog DLE for you to use.  They were:

  • Peer marking
  • Designing content as a learner
  • Job support content

So the plan for this post was to look at those areas and to review your Q&A posted in the forum.  There were some interesting responses in the answers that I think we could review.

Before we start though, I’ve had a request for a blog mentor from this group.  The person is completely new and wanted someone with experience of this blog to help understand this blog.  If you would like to volunteer to mentor someone for a few minutes a month to help them understand this blog, let me know.

I know some people have approached mentors outside the group to discuss this blog; we’ll find time to share that today, or, if you’d prefer, you can add your thoughts via your blogs.

I know that creating reflective blogs has helped people understand this blog.  If you’ve publicised your blog and want comments, feel free to add your details via the open Google docs list.

Image from FlickR Courtesy of WWarby And you’re back in the room.

How different is that when compared to what we think of as blended learning – a classroom with an elearning module addition.

I’ve written about this before and it seems people in L&D struggle with the idea of relinquishing control over pushing content.  I understand…I used to be like you.

I too thought I could author outstanding content.  I too thought I had to create content that suited my learners VAKOG styles.  I too thought my USP was creating great and inspirational content. What frustrates me now is that appears to be a belief that it has to stay like this.  If it changes, people seem to be asking:

  • how are we going to demonstrate ROI?
  • how can we demonstrate we’ve added value?
  • how will we use all those metrics we’ve created?

I was looking at one of my Linkedin groups the other day and saw this question:

ROI – it is a challenge to measure ROI on learning. Can anyone point me in the right direction as to tools that can measure this for organisations?

The obvious response (to me) was to post the Bozart-Ferguson magic formula.  The result?  Responses discussing tools to measure ROI.

There was an interesting discussion on Twitter the other evening that was asking about disruption in L&D.  If we’re not supporting something that is statutory, we should be challenging the mandatory label.  Our role should be to identify how to break patterns of behaviour to provide business support.

What do you think?  Is our desire to create content limiting L&D?  Are we not disruptive enough?

Comments, as always, very welcome.

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4 responses to “Thanks for coming

  1. Pingback: Thanks for coming | weeklyblogclub·

  2. As I was late for your previous Masterclass I thought I’d turn up on time this week, however the classroom was empty. I left the cheque (for my attendance) on the desk at the front.

    Apologies if I disrupted the empty learning environment as I left.

  3. Pingback: Is that a challenge? | weeklyblogclub·

  4. Really enjoyed this blog – thank you

    Recently delivered the first soft skills training day for a project (skills to coach others in psychosocial approaches) and got very ‘stuck’ with the plan. Got in the room, and just delivered responsively. Plan out the window. No Eval because I forgot the happy sheet. But a really good learning day.
    Your blog made me think. So now…ROI. I was lucky enough to be able focus on the people, learning, and not worry too much.
    I wonder is this trust or poor practice.

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